Participatory Storytelling at the Mekong Delta in Vietnam

Erosion Booklet-1

download the full Media Booklet here

The Mekong Delta (or the Nine Dragon River Delta) is a low-lying coastal region located in southwestern Vietnam where the Mekong River approaches and empties into the ocean through a network of distributaries. Having many natural advantages, the Delta is known to be the country’s most productive region for agriculture and aquaculture products.

During recent decades, the Mekong Delta has become more vulnerable to natural and human-caused disasters. In addition to the pressure from economic development activities, such as dam construction for hydropower plants in the upper regions of Mekong river basin, the Delta has to face the impact of storms,
floods and the other potential impacts of climate change. The Mekong Delta is among the world’s most vulnerable deltas to sea level rise.

Many areas of the Mekong Delta region are forecasted to become flooded by seawater and more intensive and frequent natural catastrophes are predicted. In the memory of many Ca Mau people, disasters such as hurricane Linda (1997), called the “fifth storm”, remain unforgettable.

Erosion along the West Coast of the Mekong Delta has been
significant and is seriously threatening communities.
Houses and farming land have been washed out, threatening the lives of the people. In efforts to stop erosion, different types of protection have been established along the shoreline of the Mekong Delta, including mangrove reforestation as an ecosystem approach to the construction of concrete dykes. However, the most coastal areas still remain non- or insufficiently protected.

The Mekong Delta (or the Nine Dragon River Delta) is a low-lying coastal region located in southwestern Vietnam where the Mekong River approaches and empties into the ocean through a network of distributaries. During recent decades, the Mekong Delta has become more vulnerable to natural and human-caused disasters. In addition to the pressure from economic development activities, such as dam construction for hydropower plants in the upper regions of Mekong river basin, the Delta has to face the impact of storms, floods and the other potential impacts of climate change. The Mekong Delta is among the world’s most vulnerable deltas to sea level rise.

PanNature, a vietnamese environmental NGO, together with its partners planned to document the situation of the people living at the West Coast of the Mekong Delta. During the field trip to film the impacts of the erosion, PanNature together with ParticipatoryStory met inhabitants of Ca Mau and Kien Giang and empowered them to develop their own audio-slideshow to motivate them to tell their stories. This project also included the production of a more detailed and informative video about the situation at the Mekong Delta. This video contains three episodes, which you can find at the end of this post. Parts of this project have also been used for the multi-media exhibition on climate change “KlimaTisch“. But first, here is what the inhabitants of the Mekong Delta wanted us to know…

 

Mrs. Hua Thi The, Kien Giang province

 

Mrs. Lam Thi Diep, Kien Giang province

Climate change is becoming more and more complicated. The weather in the Mekong Delta is getting increasingly
unpredictable and extreme. As such, erosion in the western coastal areas of Ca Mau peninsula will continue to be a big
threat to the environment and to the people living in those areas.
In order to reduce future destruction, an innovative solution is needed, requiring not only massive investment from the
government but also active participation and support from the local people and international community.

Please have a look here at the more detailed video: “Erosion – Living at the coastline”.

 

This project has been realized in Vietnam in cooperation with

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